Brooke M. Feldman

Personal blogging website. Opinions are my own.

We know that any gains made in treatment often plummet and fall apart when communities aren’t equipped with the nutrients of resources necessary to serve as fertile soil for continued recovery.

Whenever a public health crisis cascades upon us, it is natural that we grasp at the quick fixes and shiny objects that capture our attention. As history has shown us however, these sort of responses rarely yield long-term success and can instead result in a slew of unanticipated consequences that further compound the concern. With increased attention and a much welcomed sense of urgency emerging when it comes to addressing substance use challenges in this country, it is important that we continue to think globally on the issue and not settle for narrow and insufficient resolutions.

One area in which we can direct our focus is in the public perception that treatment is the be-all and end-all solution to addressing substance use challenges. While access to evidence-based, clinically sound, culturally appropriate and readily available mental health and substance use treatment is of extraordinary importance, access to initiating and sustaining recovery is something that extends far beyond merely access to treatment. We must take care to remember, as well as to educate others, that increasing access to treatment in and of itself is far from a comprehensive response to facing addiction and facilitating recovery.

Treatment is but one pane on the larger recovery umbrella that encompasses all of the resources and supports an individual and their family may need to initiate and sustain recovery.

Although it is true that for many folks, having immediate access to quality treatment is an instrumental ingredient in their wellness and recovery journeys, we must not forget that long-term community-based recovery support services are just as influential and necessary when it comes to sufficiently addressing substance use challenges in this country. As a matter of fact, long-term community-based recovery support services that offer peer support in the areas of employment, education, housing, life skills and more are a vital and critical resource if we are ever to see true, lasting opportunities for individual, family and community recovery.

As we continue to advocate for a large-scale response to our country’s large-scale substance misuse and associated costs problem, it is imperative that we do not settle for anything less than what is truly necessary for individual, family and community recovery. While we certainly ought to continue assertively advocating for much needed improved access to quality treatment, we must also speak just as loudly to the need for increased and improved community-based recovery support services.  We must not settle for narrow and insufficient resolutions.  We must not forget about the soil.

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